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Brazilian senators reserve hope and patience over impeachment and future

Brazilian senators reserve hope and patience over impeachment and future

As the Brazilian Senate is poised to vote for the trial of President Dilma Rousseff on May 11, high expectation and uncertainty both hover over the prospect of the largest economy in Latin America.

Deputies will decid whether to impeach the first female head of state of Brazil.

If to be impeached, Rousseff will be suspended for 180 days and her vice president will become acting president.

(Soundbite) ANA AMELIA LEMOS, Senator
“With the end of a cycle, all will change with the (possible) arrival of a new government. The hope is that things can adjust up a bit more, but that does not mean that the problems we are now facing will be solved in a snap.”

(Soundbite) RONALDO CAIADO, Senator
“This is the moment you give legal certainty signs, strict criteria, as every businessman wants. At this time we will raise new investment.”

(Soundbite) ANA AMELIA LEMOS, Senator
“It will take a while and it takes a little patience and tolerance, as it has appeared so far that one may be leaving the government and (the other one enters).”

(Soundbite) RONALDO CAIADO, Senator
“This country is able to present itself to good investment, especially in the primary sectors such as industry and research. Brazil is a promising country.”

Whatever the turnout of the partisan fight and the economic weighing, the country now has no choice but level out the longstanding chaos and find a way out.

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