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Mexican museum dedicated to remember growing of seeds of Cuban revolution

Mexican museum dedicated to remember growing of seeds of Cuban revolution

Tuxpan, the port city in Mexico’s southeastern state of Veracruz, has been very lucky to witness the very beginning of the Cuban revolution.

In November 1956, Fidel Castro, his younger brother Raul Castro, their comrade Ernesto Guevara as well as some other revolutionaries departed from Tuxpan on a yacht named Granma, heading to Cuba to carry on with their guerilla war, until securing the power in 1959.

(Soundbite, Spanish) Nancy Karina del Angel, Museum Coordinator
“It was a very important point, because the revolution started here in Tuxpan. This was where the main leaders of the Cuban revolution led by Fidel Castro and Raul Castro met (their comrade) Ernesto Guevara.”

Nowadays, people learn about these snippets of history at the Mexican-Cuban Friendship Museum, through a full range of photos, murals, models and written materials.

Local people view the museum as a “mute witness” to the socialist pursuit almost 60 years ago, when Fidel Castro took temporary shelter here to hatch new strategy and learn guerilla tactics.

(Soundbite, Spanish) Nancy Karina del Angel, Museum Coordinator
“It is an extremely important relationship you can have, not only with Fidel (Castro), but with the Cuban government. Fidel represents all the people of Cuba and Mexico has always been a friend of all the people. The importance had been revealed since the arrival of Fidel in Mexico. The support was provided through the figure of Fidel for his government to achieve its revolution.”

The museum was then the house where the Cuban revolutionaries met to plan the coup against the regime of U.S.-supported dictator Fulgencio Batista, with one of the rooms the weapons they would use.

Among the exhibited objects, the replica of Yacht Granma attracts the most attention, which has been valued as the vehicle to load the revolutionary ideas of Cuba.

(Soundbite, Spanish) Nancy Karina del Angel, Museum Coordinator
“Generally we receive students from schools and other public (personalities). We are open to all in Mexico and to the public. We receive them with the most cordial manner.”

Most visitors to the museum are foreigners.

In November, a special event will be held at the venue to commemorate its decades of existence and the significance it means for the Cuban revolution.

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